Coca-Cola

RATING

SECTOR

Beverages

WEBSITE

CONTACT

1 Coca Cola Plz NW

Atlanta, GA 30313

404-676-2121

STOCK EXCHANGE

LISTING

N/A

EMPLOYEES

62,600

CHIEF SUSTAINABILITY OFFICER

Bea Perez

AWARDS

Massmart Supplier Environmental Awards

CONTENT SOURCE

FURTHER READING

Coca-Cola - Quick View

SECTIONS :  Sustainability    Evaluation  •  Progress  •  Watch  •  Overview

Company Activity

The Coca-Cola Company is a manufacturer, distributor and marketer of nonalcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups. The Company also manufactures, distributes and markets some finished beverages.  They craft the brands and choice of drinks that people love,  in ways that create a more sustainable business.

In Coca-Cola’s concentrate operations, The Coca-Cola Company typically generates net operating revenues by selling concentrates and syrups to authorized bottling partners. Their bottling partners combine the concentrates with still and/or sparkling water, and/or sweeteners, depending on the product, to prepare, package, sell and distribute finished beverages. The finished product operations consist primarily of company-owned or -controlled bottling, sales and distribution operations.

Company Sustainable Activity

The Climate Goal → Reducing Their Impact

The company set a goal in 2013 to reduce the carbon footprint of the “drink in your hand” by 25% by 2020, when the company brought several climate-related initiatives together to manage and improve our impacts.

According to the company 

“REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS: 

Asia & Pacific

Through the Clean Water 24 program, the company has provided drinking water to 2 million people in China affected by natural disasters. Since 2013, Clean Water 24 has responded to earthquakes, landslides and other emergencies nearly 200 times, providing water in an average of 11 hours and in as little as six hours. The program transforms the traditional donation format into a life-saving model by integrating the logistical and warehousing advantages of the Coca-Cola China system with the resources of local government and civil society groups. This has enabled them to deliver more than 16 million bottles of drinking water to disaster-stricken communities.

Europe, Middle East & Africa

In Spain and Portugal, the company is supporting Mares Circulares (Circular Seas), a program that brings public sector and civil society organizations together to clean open waters and 270 kilometers of beaches of plastic waste. The program incorporates education, civic involvement and research, and is even recruiting 50 fishing boats to participate in the project. All PET-based plastic waste collected will be used in the Coca-Cola value chain in Spain. The Coca-Cola Foundation, Coca-Cola Iberia and Coca-Cola European Partners joined forces to support the innovative program.

Latin America

Coca-Cola’s Brazil business unit and the Coca-Cola Brazil Foundation launched Negras Potências, an innovative initiative to empower Afro-Brazilian women and girls, one of the most vulnerable groups in the country. The company joined efforts with Fundo Baobá, a fund whose endowment creation was supported by the Kellogg Foundation to foster racial equality, and Benfeitoria, a crowdfunding platform, to launch Brazil’s largest matching fund. The partners are supporting projects led by Afro-Brazilian women by building the women’s communications and fundraising capacities and matching the funding they raise. 13 of 17 selected projects reached their targets and are now being implemented. Projects raised R$ 549 thousand including Coca-Cola Brazil’s matching funds and R$ 206 thousand without match (individual donors).

North America

At the 2018 Special Olympics USA Games, attendees had the opportunity to give back in more ways than one through unique “reverse” vending machines. Coca-Cola North America’s Customer Sustainability and Digital Platforms & Innovation teams collaborated with Special Olympics, Swire Coca-Cola USA and the New York-based equipment supplier, Atlas RVM Systems, in the weeks preceding the games to develop two special recycling stations in Seattle that accept the deposit of PET bottles or aluminum cans. Each recycled package triggered a five cent donation to Special Olympics Washington through the Coca-Cola Give platform, and consumers were prompted to text a code to learn about additional opportunities to support their local communities.”

Certificates

  • FSSC 22000
  • ISO 14001
  • LEED

Sustainable Development Goals

How company covers SDGs

SDG 1 (1.5)

For The Coca-Cola Company, “sustainably sourced” means that ingredients sourced from their farm suppliers meet standards for human and workplace rights, environmental protection and responsible farming management that are set out in their Sustainable Agriculture Guiding Principles (SAGP). They have worked with their suppliers to help them demonstrate that they meet the SAGP criteria by using the leading global sustainable agriculture standards for the commodities and products they provide to their company. Bonsucro and Rainforest Alliance are among the leading sustainable farming standards they support.

Their mango sustainability program began in 2015 in collaboration with one of their key suppliers, Foods & Inns Ltd (F&I), and other partners. Farmers were provided tools, training and best practices in integrated pest management and crop handling. Farmers also benefit from a purposebuilt network of F&I direct supply collection centers, allowing them to avoid trader commissions or “mandi” (transport, weighing and unloading charges). Today, F&I is ready to supply all the mangos we buy from them as sustainably certified—a key factor in their growth plan for their India juice portfolio. The mangos go into products for Maaza in India and Minute Maid in the U.S. and Europe.

SDG 2 (2.3, 2.4)

They set a goal in 2013 to reduce the carbon footprint of the “drink in your hand” by 25% by 2020, when they brought several climate-related initiatives together to manage and improve their impacts.

In September 2018, The Coca-Cola Company was pleased to announce their participation in the Climate-Resilient Value Chains Leaders Platform. This platform, led by Business for Social Responsibility (BSR), will enable company value chains and communities to thrive in the face of climate change and allow companies to learn from peers addressing climate risks. Data from CDP notes that 76% of suppliers reported climate risk as having the power to significantly alter their business, underscoring the importance of this collaborative resilience effort.

SDG 3 (3.4)

To meet these changing consumer needs, they have updated their approach to more effectively measure their sugar and calorie reduction efforts. Since their CEO-led Our Way Forward initiative was launched in 2017, they have been aggressively reformulating recipes to reduce sugar, using their marketing muscle to promote low- and no-calorie beverage options and investing along with their system to make smaller packages more available. They have also been accelerating the expansion of beverage options across their portfolio.

  • Gradually reducing sugar across their entire portfolio
  • Making smaller, more convenient packages so controlling sugar intake is easier
  • Offering more new drinks that provide benefits like nutrition and hydration
  • Giving people the information they need to make informed choices
  • 425,000 tons of sugar removed on an annualized basis through innovation such as new recipes and smaller package sizes in 2017/2018

SDG 5 (5.1, 5.5, 5.a, 5.b, 5.c)

The Benefits of Water Access to Women: 

Women carry the greatest burden from the lack of access to safe drinking water, spending an estimated 200 million hours every day fetching water—time that could be better used, including on economic activities. In 2018, USAID, The Coca-Cola Company and Water and Development Alliance* collaborated with research firm Ipsos to conduct the Ripple Effect Study, which rigorously assessed how improved access to water and sanitation enables women’s empowerment, and promotes gender equality. The study identified eight pathways to empowerment, including improvements in women’s health, income, nutrition, safety and security, education, leadership and skills, time savings, and shifts in community roles and gender norms.

Since 2016, nearly 200,000 women have been trained and empowered through “Success is ME,” the biggest and most comprehensive professional activation program for women in Poland. The Coca-Cola Foundation and the Success Written in Lipstick Foundation support job seekers and entrepreneurs through online courses, lectures and workshops. Evaluations show that 98.7% of users would recommend Success is ME to their friends.

In 2018: 

  • 865,787 women empowered; 31% increase over 2017
  • 17 countries added in 2018, for a total of 92 countries

Supporting People and Communities: 

From 2017 to 2018, The Coca‑Cola Foundation: • More than tripled the level of funding to recycling projects • Increased funding to women’s empowerment programs by 38%

In 2018: 

  • 1.5% of operating income invested back into local communities from The Coca-Cola Company and The Coca-Cola Foundation
  • Nearly $22.5 million committed in support of 59 water projects from The Coca-Cola Foundation
  • More than $10 million to 37 women’s empowerment organizations across the world from The Coca-Cola Foundation

Latin America: Empowering Afro-Brazilian Women Entrepreneurs

2018 Highlights: 

  • In Mexico, launched Ciel blue bottle, a package made from 100% recycled plastic PET.
  • In Brazil, launched Coca-Cola Plus Espresso Coffee with 40% more caffeine and 50% less sugar than original Coca-Cola.
  • In Chile, the Company focused on encouraging a circular economy through Actitud RE and Vivamos Más Retornable, two nationwide high-impact campaigns aimed at promoting refillable consumption and inspiring reusing and recycling. The Chile Ministry of Environment granted an eco-labeling seal that recognizes products with sustainable packaging. The Vital Mineral Water Eco-flex bottle, which uses 30% less plastic, was the first product to receive the “low in waste” seal.
  • In the Galapagos Islands, The Coastal Cleanup Initiative has collected 346,126 kg of solid waste from oceans and the environment.
  • In Latin America, the Cada Gota Cuenta initiative supports water access programs in communities and promotes awareness around using water appropriately. More than 80,000 people have benefited from the initiative.

SDG 6 (6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 6.a, 6.b)

By the end of 2018, RAIN, the Replenish Africa Initiative of The Coca-Cola Foundation, had provided safe drinking water to more than 2.8 million people in Africa and supported water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programs in more than 2,000 communities across 41 African countries.

Replenishing Cape Town in a Time of Drought

As Cape Town faced the impending threat of “Day Zero”— the day its water reserves would run dry—an innovative ecological intervention to improve how fast and fully the upstream Atlantis aquifer could replenish itself began in early 2018. Funded by the Greater Cape Town Water Fund and implemented by The Nature Conservancy with support from RAIN, the Replenish Africa Initiative of The Coca-Cola Foundation, the program is improving the lives of local residents while increasing water security across Cape Town’s water supply system. The program is also creating economic opportunities for women on the front lines of the restoration effort.

Planned Impact: 

  • 8 million liters of water replenished per year
  • 60,000 residents of the Atlantis area positively impacted
  • 4 million people in greater Cape Town area gaining increased water security

Supporting People and Communities

The Coca-Cola Company is committed to giving back to communities 1% of its prior year’s operating income annually through The Coca-Cola Foundation and company donations. In 2018, The Coca-Cola Company and The Coca-Cola Foundation contributed nearly $125 million ($89,351,884 from The Coca-Cola Foundation and $35,394,752 from The Coca-Cola Company) to directly benefit nearly 288 organizations across more than 139 countries and territories. They significantly increased the amount of funding provided for recycling and women’s empowerment: The Foundation contributed almost $20.5 million for recycling programs and committed more than $10 million for women’s empowerment.

In 2018: 

  • 1.5% of operating income invested back into local communities from The Coca-Cola Company and The Coca-Cola Foundation
  • Nearly $22.5 million committed in support of 59 water projects from The Coca-Cola Foundation
  • More than $10 million to 37 women’s empowerment organizations across the world from The Coca-Cola Foundation

SDG 8 (8.5, 8.7, 8.8)

India produces more mangos than any country on earth, mostly from small farms. These growers often face economic challenges for their basic subsistence, so prioritizing more long-term sustainable practices can be difficult. Due to the sheer number of people involved where small growers are the predominant source of agricultural supply, there are a variety of challenges. Their work collaborating with mango growers has seen remarkable results in a few short years, both for the farmers and for their business as they seek to accelerate the growth of their portfolio of sustainably sourced, fruit-based beverages across the region.

SDG 12 (12.2, 12.5, 12.6, 12.8, 12.a)

Make Packaging Wast a Thing of the Past

In January 2018, they established three fundamental goals:

1 DESIGN

Make their packaging 100% recyclable globally by 2025—and use at least 50% recycled material in their packaging by 2030. • 88% of The Coca-Cola Company’s consumer packaging is recyclable— up from 85% in early 2018.* • 30% recycled material was used in their packaging globally in 2018.

2 COLLECT

Collect and recycle a bottle or can for each one they sell by 2030. • 58% of the equivalent bottles and cans they introduced into the market in 2018 were refilled, collected or recycled.* • Taking additional packaging types into consideration, that rate was 56% for 2018.*

3 PARTNER

Bring people together to support a healthy, debris-free environment. • $15 million was committed in 2018 to invest in Circulate Capital, an investment management firm dedicated to incubating and financing companies and infrastructure that prevent the flow of plastic waste into the world’s oceans.

Building on a Decade of Water Replenishment

Tracking Progress: 

  • 155%of water used in their finished beverages safely returned to communities and nature in 2018
  • 786,452 people with lives measurably transformed through improved water access

2010-2018: 

  • 1T+ liters of water replenished
  • $124 million invested in water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) projects

SDG 13 (13.1)

They set a goal in 2013 to reduce the carbon footprint of the “drink in your hand” by 25% by 2020, when they brought several climate-related initiatives together to manage and improve their impacts.

Their climate goal is an example of how the Coca-Cola system can work together for a greater impact. Their business units and bottling partners around the world have set reduction targets through 2020, and have been given the flexibility to look across their value chain to implement locally relevant programs designed to help meet their goals. To empower global managers to reach this goal, they have developed a Carbon Scenario Planner to assist in standardizing a forecast methodology for carbon in the system supply chain and to support regional target setting.

SDG 14 (14.1)

Bringing Circular Thinking to Ocean Plastics

In Spain and Portugal, they are supporting Mares Circulares (Circular Seas), a program that brings public sector and civil society organizations together to clean open waters and 270 kilometers of beaches of plastic waste. The program incorporates education, civic involvement and research, and is even recruiting 50 fishing boats to participate in the project. All PET-based plastic waste collected will be used in the Coca-Cola value chain in Spain. The Coca-Cola Foundation, Coca-Cola Iberia and Coca-Cola European Partners joined forces to support the innovative program.

SDG 17 (17.14, 17.16, 17.17)

Partnerships are core to their business and enable them to achieve more together. They can progress faster and with more impact by working with stakeholders who can bring their expertise and know-how to help create a better world.

Progress

Key Performance Indicators

Water: 

Safely return to communities and nature an amount of water equivalent to what the company uses in our finished beverages and their production.

  • 155% of Sales Volume Replenished (2018)
  • Improve water efficiency in manufacturing operations by 25%.
  • 16% Water Used Reduction Since 2010 (2018)

Packaging: 

Work with partners to recover and recycle the equivalent of 75% of the bottles and cans the company introduces into developed markets.

  • 58 % of Bottles and Cans the company Refilled or Helped Recover Equivalent to What the company Introduced into the Marketplace (2018). 
  • 56 % of Bottles and Cans the company Refilled or Helped Recover Equivalent to What the company Introduced into the Marketplace Taking Additional Packaging Types into Consideration (2018). 

Climate:

  • Reduction of 21% approximately of the carbon footprint of the “drink in your hand” in 2018 since 2010 
More progress can be found in How Company Cover SDGs

Coca-Cola has a clear sustainable agenda, with precise goals and targets. They conduct relevant SDG-related activities and are transparent. However, Coca-Cola company is amongst the biggest plastic polluters on the planet. Even though they focus on using recyclable plastic, they don’t want to stop using it yet. They also create obvious obesity issues. Because of their non accordance with SDG 15: Life on Land, SDG 12: Responsible consumption and production and SDG 3: Good Health and Well-Being, and because of the scope of their production, Coca-Cola gets the rating C.  

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